Results found for "DensDeck®"

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  • Fire Resistance
  • Accidental Puncture
  • Wind Resistance
  • Foot Traffic
  • Fire Resistance
  • Accidental Puncture
  • Foot Traffic
  • Wind Uplift
  • Very Severe Hail
  • Upgrades Hail Resistance
  • Strengthens Puncture Resistance
  • Maintains Water Resistance
  • Thickness, nominal
    5/8( (15.9 mm) ± 1/32( (.8 mm)
  • Width, standard
    * (1219 mm) ± 1/8( (3 mm)
  • Length, standard
    * (1219 mm) and  8* (2438 mm) ± 1/4( (6.4 mm)
  • Weight, nominal, lbs./sq. ft. (Kg/m2)
    3.0 (14.6)
  • R Value4, ft2•°F•hr/BTU (m2•K/W)
    .67 * Tested in accordance with ASTM E661
  • Fire Resistance
  • Hail Resistance
  • Wind Resistance
  • Special Applications
  • Thickness
    Nominal: 1/4″ (6.4 mm) ± 1/16″ (1.6 mm)
  • Width
    Standard: 4′ (1219 mm) ± 1/8″ (3 mm)
  • Length
    Standard: 4′ (1219 mm) AND 8′ (2438 mm) ± 1/4″ (6.4 mm)
  • Weight
    lbs/sq. ft. nominal (kg/m²): 1.2 (5.9)1
  • Flexural Strength
    Parallel, lbf. Min. (N) ≥40 (178)2
  • R Value
    °F•ft2•hr/BTU (m2•K/W): .283
  • Fire Resistance
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Special Applications
  • Fire Resistance
  • Special Applications
  • Thickness
    nominal inches2: 1″ (25.4 mm), ± 1/32″(0.8 mm)
  • Width
    Nominal2: 24″ (610 mm) – 3/32″(2.4 mm)
  • Length
    standard2: 8′ (2440 mm) to 12′ (3658 mm) ± 1/4″ (6.4 mm)
  • Weight
    lbs./sq. ft., nominal (kg/m²): 4 (19.5)1
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Fire Resistance
  • Ease Of Use
  • Versatility
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Fire Resistance
  • Ease-of-use
  • Versatility
  • Thickness
    ½” (12.7 mm)
  • Width
    Nominal: 4′ (1219 mm) ± 1/8″ (3 mm)
  • Length
    standard: 8′ (2440 mm), 9′ (2743 mm), 10′ (3048 mm), ± 1/4″ (6 mm)
  • Weight
    lbs/sq. ft. nominal (kg/m²): 1.9 (9)
  • Humidified Deflection
    <2/8″ (6 mm)1, 3
  • R Value
    °F•ft2•hr/BTU (m2•K/W): .56 (0.099)2
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Ease-of-use
  • Versatility
  • Thickness
    5/8″ (15.9 mm)
  • Width x Length
    4′ x 8′ (1220 mm x 2438 mm)
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Ease-of-use
  • Versatility
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Ease Of Use
  • Warranty
  • Square Edge
    3’-11 7/8” (1.216 m) x 9’-11 7/8” (3.044 m) – sized for 4’ x 10’
  • Tongue & Groove
    3’-11 1/2” (1.206 m) x 9’-11 7/8” (3.044 m) – sized for 4’ x 10’
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Versatility
  • Ease Of Use
  • Square Edge
    3′-11 7⁄8″ (1.216 m) x 7′-11 7⁄8″ (2.435 m) – sized for 4′ x 8′
  • Tongue & Groove
    3′-11 1⁄2″ (1.206 m) x 7′-11 7⁄8″ (2.435 m) – sized for 4′ x 8′
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Versatility
  • Square Edge
    3’-11 7⁄8” (1.216 m) x 7’-11 7⁄8” (2.435 m)
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Building Envelope
  • Submittals
  • Installation
  • Ease Of Use
  • Square Edge
    3’-11 7/8” (1.216 m) x 9’-11 7/8” (3.044 m) – sized for 4’ x 10’

A high-performance, self-adhered flashing tape used to treat roof joints and seams.  Made with an acrylic adhesive and proprietary film, this tape offers exceptional durability and tear resistance once installed.

  • Seals sloped roof seams and joints against air and moisture infiltration
  • Excellent conformability for bonding around curves and corners
  • High-performance film offers tear and impact resistance
  • Compatible with many sealants
  • May be applied in temperatures as low as 20°F
  • AAMA 711-13 compliant
  • Ease Of Use
  • Moisture Resistance
  • Square Edge
    3’-11 7⁄8” (1.216 m) x 7’-11 7⁄8” (2.435 m)
  • Tongue & Groove
    3’-11 1⁄2” (1.206 m) x 7’-11 7⁄8” (2.435 m)

An impermeable, self-adhered sheet designed for use as a rough-opening flashing and transition membrane for connecting dissimilar materials to maintain air and moisture barrier continuity.

  • 25-mil composite impermeable membrane
  • Comprised of 16 mils of butyl adhesive and 9 mils of HDPP facer
  • Bonds to most surfaces, such as glass mat gypsum sheathing, poured concrete, masonry, steel and wood-based substrates
  • Ideal for drift or control joints, vertical expansion joints, gaps greater than 1” and transitions between dissimilar materials
  • Primerless application allows for faster installation time
  • May be exposed to normal weather conditions for up to 12-months
  • Backed by a Georgia-Pacific limited warranty
  • AAMA 711 Certified

A detailing compound that protects wall rough openings, penetrations, sheathing fasteners and seams. It eliminates the need for joint reinforcing tape and reduces installation time.

  • Waterproofing, adhesive and detailing compound made with STP Technology
  • Creates a highly durable continuous elastomeric flashing membrane
  • Bonds and cures in adverse weather conditions and may be applied to damp surfaces
  • Tolerates rain immediately after application
  • May be fully exposed to UV and normal weather conditions for up to 12 months
  • Backed by a Georgia-Pacific limited warranty
  • AAMA 714 Compliant
  • Provides a highly durable, monolithic , elastomeric water-resistive barrier
  • May be applied in temperatures as low as 25ºF and cures in temperatures as low as 32ºF
  • Vapor permeable, allowing damp surfaces to dry
  • Fast cure allows for next steps of construction in a shorter amount of time

292 filtered resource results Reset filters

48 filtered FAQ results Reset filters

Can I use Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing on vaulted ceilings or metal roofs?

Yes, Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing can be used in both types of construction as long as you maintain a minimum 3/4″ airspace for the foil surface. In both cases, the foil face should be installed facing down.

What does the stamp on my OSB panel mean?

On every Georgia-Pacific sheathing panel you should be able to find an APA grade stamp. This stamp is your assurance that the product is manufactured in accordance with the APA’s rigorous program of quality inspection and testing. The grade stamp on a panel also tells you a lot about the panel – the span rating, exposure rating, panel thickness and the building code approval the panel meets.

Where can I get more information on radiant barriers?

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) – www.eren.doe.gov

Oak Ridge National Laboratory – www.ornl.gov

Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association – www.rimainternational.org

Florida Solar Energy Center – www.fsec.ucf.edu

Where else can I use radiant barrier sheathing?

You may also find that radiant barriers can expand the use of space in your home. For instance, un-insulated, unconditioned spaces such as garages, porches, and workrooms can be more comfortable with radiant barriers. Because radiant barriers help keep attics cooler, the space is more usable for storage. You can also use radiant barrier sheathing on exterior, south-facing walls that have uninterrupted sun exposure. In a wall application, the foil side of the radiant

barrier sheathing must be installed with the foil facing the outside. The foil must also have minimum 3/4″ airspace in front of it to be effective. This can be accomplished by using furring strips on the outside of the sheathing to create the 3/4″ airspace between the sheathing’s foil face and the siding, brick or other material used on the exterior of the wall. Be sure to check with your local building codes for compliance in the installation of any siding product. You may also want to check with your siding manufacturer for the use of their siding in conjunction with radiant barrier sheathing.

How much can I save by using Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing?

Energy usage varies according to many factors, including individual preferences and the fluctuation of energy costs in general. The amount of energy consumed is directly related to:

  • The house cooling system, which includes insulation levels, roof color, thermostat settings, tightness of the building envelope, climate conditions, design and location of the house, size of house, efficiency of cooling equipment and other factors.
  • The percentage contribution of heat transfer through the ceiling to the home’s cooling load. Cooling load is the amount of heat the air conditioner has to remove to sustain an adequate temperature in the living areas. Tests done by the Department of Energy show that ceiling heat gains represent about 12 to 25 percent of a home’s total cooling load.
  • Since everyone’s home and lifestyle are different, and energy costs differ from area to area, we can’t calculate your exact savings from using Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing on the roof. However, it is reasonable to expect that Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing can save you somewhere between 8 – 17% of your annual cooling energy consumption in the Southeast.
Radiant barriers work in the summer months, what about the rest of the year?

In summer, when your roof gets very hot, a radiant barrier cuts air-conditioning costs by blocking a sizable portion of the downward heat gain into the building. In the warm spring and fall, radiant barriers can help save on energy and cooling by increasing your personal comfort. During these milder seasons, outdoor air temperatures are comfortable much of the time. Yet solar energy still heats up your roof, insulation, attic air, and ceiling to temperatures that can make you uncomfortably warm. An attic radiant barrier stops almost all of this downward heat transfer so that you can stay comfortable without running your air conditioning during mild weather.

What are the biggest benefits of using Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing in attics?
  • Attic temperatures can be lowered by up to 30°F in the peak summer cooling season.
  • Up to 17% decrease in energy consumption since the cooling system can work more efficiently due to lower attic temperatures.
  • Increase in operational efficiency of cooling equipment because cooler attic temperatures allow attic mounted air conditioning systems and ductwork to operate more efficiently.
  • Increased utilization of home spaces including garages, attics, porches and other spaces that do not have climate control but stay cooler and more comfortable thanks to Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing.
Can Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing damage my shingles?

The Reflective Insulation Manufacturers Association (RIMA) has published Technical Bulletin #103, which reports that in peak summer conditions, the temperature of asphalt shingles is increased only an average of 2 to 5° F over radiant barrier roof sheathing. This is not a significant temperature rise and most shingle manufacturers have indicated that it does not affect their shingle warranties. However, you may wish to review your warranty to be sure it will not be voided. Contact your shingle manufacturer directly with any questions and ask for any changes in coverage to be provided in writing.

If I use Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing, do I still need insulation?

Yes. Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing is designed to work with, not in lieu of, standard attic insulation. Conventional insulations such as fiberglass, cellulose, foam and others do not insulate against radiant heat transfers.

How do I install Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing?

Apply Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing with the reflective (foil) side down towards the attic, directly to the roof framing. For radiant barrier sheathing to be effective long-term, the reflective side must have a minimum 3/4″ air space in front of the foil face to properly reflect radiant heat. This applies to both attic areas and cathedral type ceilings.

How do radiant barriers “block” heat?

Heat travels from a warm area to a cool area by a combination of conduction, convection, and radiation. In conduction, heat flows from a hotter material to a colder material when the two materials touch. Heat transfer by convection occurs when a liquid or gas is heated, becomes less dense, and rises.

Radiant heat travels in a straight line away from the hot surface and heats anything solid as the wave of energy hits it. The reflective material used in Thermostat radiant barrier sheathing stops up to 97% of the radiant heat from passing through to get into your attic.

Additionally, the reflective surface emits very little heat itself, so it does not transfer the heat that it blocks via radiation. In other words, it is a good heat reflector and a poor heat radiator.

What is a radiant barrier?

A radiant barrier is a layer of reflecting aluminum placed in an airspace to block radiant heat transfer between a heat-radiating surface (such as a hot roof) and a heat-absorbing surface (such as conventional attic insulation and your ceilings).

DensShield® tile backer and DensArmor Plus® interior panel differences:

DensArmor Plus® interior panels do not have a water-stopping surface coating. The coating on DensShield® tile backer provides a water barrier to stop moisture from penetrating into the product and wall. DensShield tile backer is made to be used in wet areas such as showers and tub areas as a substrate for ceramic tile. DensShield tile backer is manufactured to meet ASTM C 1178. DensArmor Plus interior panels feature a tapered edge for joint finishing while DensShield tile backer has a square edge.

Must an additional moisture barrier be supplied and installed when using DensShield Tile Backer panels?

No. The grey face (tile side) of DensShield Tile Backer has a heat cured acrylic coating which is a built-in moisture barrier and vapor retarder so that no additional moisture barrier is required. In fact, an additional moisture barrier to the back side of DensShield Tile Backer is NOT recommended. Prior to the tile installation it is permissible to apply a fluid applied membrane to the face of DensShield Tile Backer for enhanced moisture resistance.

What are the similarities and differences in DensArmor Plus® Interior Panels and DensShield® tile backer?

Both use fiberglass mats as the back facer material. When installed against the wall framing, both products provide a fiberglass mat surface facing the wall cavity that resists possible mold growth on the back of the panel. DensShield® tile backer and DensArmor Plus® panels both have cores that are moisture resistant, manufactured to ASTM C 1396, section 7 specifications.

How is DensShield Tile Backer fastened in place?

No special or unique fasteners are required to fasten DensShield Tile Backer panels in place. For wood studs: galvanized roofing nails, rust-resistant drywall screws or bugle head deck screws. Fasteners should be long enough to penetrate at least 3⁄4 (19 mm) into the wood framing members. For metal framing: a variety of rust-resistant screws can be used.

Can DensShield Tile Backer be used in non-tile wet area applications?

Yes. In many applications, DensShield Tile Backer is used for its moisture barrier and moisture-resistant qualities for non-tiled walls and ceilings. There are several methods for finishing the panel depending on the environment. The environments of non-wet, high humidity and wet areas are described in the DensShield Tile Backer technical brochure.  Each environment has its own finishing recommendation. A finishing method must never be used in a more severe environment than described.

Can I install DensShield Tile Backer either parallel or perpendicular to the wall framing?

Yes. The flexural strength of DensShield Tile Backer panels is approximately the same in both parallel and perpendicular directions. This allows wall and ceiling applications to be installed either parallel or perpendicular to the supporting members and results in fewer panel joints. DensShield Tile Backer can be installed over both wood framing and steel stud construction by spacing fasteners 6” (152 mm) o.c. along studs for wood or a minimum 20-guage (33 mils) steel framing.*

*For equivalent and effective guage steel studs, we have no evaluation or installation recommendations.

Is the acrylic coated side of DensShield® Tile Backer installed face out?

Yes. The DensShield® Tile Backer panel should be positioned next to framing with the acrylic coated (grey) side facing away from studs. Apply mortar or mastic and tile to the acrylic coated (grey) side of DensShield Tile Backer panels. The built-in acrylic coating stops moisture penetration at the surface.

Can DensShield® Tile Backer be used in floor applications?

Yes. Both 1 ⁄4” (6.4 mm) and 1 ⁄2” (12.7 mm) DensShield® Tile Backer can be used in floor applications. Both of these thicknesses passed the Robinson Floor Test, the industry standard floor test for residential and light commercial ratings. The Robinson Floor Test (ASTM C627) is designed to determine how a tile assembly holds up under extreme wear and weight conditions. DensShield Tile Backer achieves the same light commercial rating as cement and fiber cement backers.

Are special tile setting materials needed to work with DensShield Tile Backer panels?

No. DensShield Tile Backer requires the same type of setting materials as any other backer board. No special mastics or thin-sets are required. To set tile, use a latex-Portland cement mortar, or other products recommended by the mortar manufacturer. Follow the tile setting manufacturer’s instructions for applying tile setting material. Dry-set or thin-set latex-modified mortars are most commonly used with DensShield Tile Backer and cement backers. Use only latex-modified mortars in floor applications.

Is ToughRock® Shaftliner listed in the same fire-rated assemblies as DensGlass® Shaftliner?

ToughRock Shaftliner is listed in assemblies with the UL type designation TP-6. DensGlass® Shaftliner is listed in assemblies with the UL type designation DGUSL. Please consult the specific assembly for permitted products and details. For additional information concerning fire ratings and fire safety, go to www.buildgp.com/safetyinfo.

DensShield Tile Backer seems softer than cement boards. Does it have the same floor ratings?

DensShield Tile Backer is rated for residential and light commercial floors. 1⁄4” (6.4 mm) DensShield Tile Backer panels have a compressive strength of approximately 1200-1500 lbs psi, and 1⁄2” (12.7 mm) DensShield Tile Backer has a compressive strength of between 450 and 600 lbs psi. That means that it would typically take a load of 450 to 600 lbs psi to start to crush 1⁄2” (12.7 mm) DensShield Tile Backer. When a load is applied to the floor tile, the tile distributes the load over its entire area.

Is ToughRock Shaftliner® mold resistant?

ToughRock Shaftliner incorporates moisture-resistant paper but is not tested specifically for mold resistance. If you require a shaftliner product that has been tested for mold resistance in accordance with ASTM D3273, consider using DensGlass® Shaftliner. Please note that ToughRock® Shaftliner is not designed for exposure to constant high-moisture conditions or direct water.”

Should the fasteners be countersunk?

No. Fasteners should be flush with the coated surface and are not to be countersunk.

Can I use DensShield® Tile Backer in fire-rated wall assemblies?

Yes. 5⁄8” (15.9 mm) DensShield® Fireguard® Tile Backer is manufactured to meet Type X requirements (per ASTM C1178) and can be substituted in any generic assemblies using a 5⁄8” (15.9 mm) Type X gypsum board. This permits the use of numerous 1-hour and 2-hour assemblies for both wood and metal frame construction. Transition to regular 5⁄89 (15.9 mm) Type X board is also minimized.  For additional information concerning fire ratings and fire safety, go to www.buildgp.com/safetyinfo.

Does ToughRock® Shaftliner have recycled content?

The paper facers are made with 100% recycled paper. The total amount of recycled content depends on the manufacturing location.

Does ToughRock® Shaftliner carry a limited warranty for exposure to weather conditions?

Georgia-Pacific Gypsum does not offer a limited warranty for ToughRock Shaftliner for exposure to weather conditions. If you require a product that does have a limited warranty for exposure to normal weather conditions, consider using DensGlass® Shaftliner.

How many sheets are in a unit of OSB?

The number of panels in a unit of OSB varies depending on the type and thickness of product. On sheathing products, the piece count is typically stenciled on the side of the unit. Other products have corrugated side protectors that should indicate piece count. If you need a piece count and neither of those are visible, please contact GP at 800-284-5347.

What does the "span rating" of an OSB panel mean?

Within the grade stamp on a panel you will find the span rating. When there are two numbers separated by a slash (i.e. 48/24), the first number is the maximum recommended center-to-center spacing for supports in inches when the panel is used for roof sheathing with the long dimension across supports. The second number is the maximum center-to-center spacing of supports in inches when the panel is used for sub-flooring with the long dimension across supports.

Can OSB be used for outdoor projects?

OSB is not recommended for outdoor projects. OSB is considered an Exposure 1 panel, which means they may be used for applications where construction delays may be expected prior to providing protection. But OSB is not suitable for long-term exposure to the weather.

Can you paint OSB?

OSB can be painted with an oil-based paint. Latex paints are not recommended.

What is the flame spread classification for OSB?

Class III or C

What is the proper way to store OSB on the yard or on a job site?

Whenever possible, store panels under a roof. Keep sanded panels and appearance-grade products away from high-traffic areas to prevent damage to surfaces. Use pieces of lumber to weigh down the top panel in a stack to reduce warpage from humidity. If moisture absorption is expected, cut steel bands on bundles to prevent edge damage.

If panels must be stored outside, stack them on a level platform supported by at least three 4x4s to keep them off the ground. Place one 4×4 in the center and the other two 4x4s 12 to 16 inches from the ends. Never leave panels or the platform in direct contact with the ground.

Cover the stack loosely with plastic sheets or tarps. Anchor the covering at the top of the stack, but keep it open and away from the sides and bottom to ensure good ventilation. Tight coverings prevent air circulation and when exposed to sunlight, may promote mold or mildew. (Source: APA Builder Tip U450: Storage and Handling of APA Trademarked Panels)

What is the difference between Structural 1 and Exposure 1 panels?

Structural I refers to certain specialized strength and stiffness characteristics of wood structural panels while the term Exposure 1 refers to the glue bond durability of a wood structural panel. Structural I, also referred to as “STRUC I”, may be OSB or plywood and is, essentially, a subcategory of APA Rated Sheathing. Panels designated Structural I must meet all of the manufacturing and performance standards of Rated Sheathing, as well as certain additional requirements.

The advantages of Structural I Rated Sheathing over standard Rated Sheathing panels of the same Performance Category are realized in certain specialized engineered applications such as engineered shear walls and engineered horizontal diaphragms. Specialized construction situations requiring installation of roof sheathing panels with the strength axis parallel to supporting structure also benefit from the use of Structural I sheathing. Structural I is of no additional benefit for other traditional construction applications. Consult a professional engineer for specific applications.

What is the proper way to store plywood on the yard or on a job site?

Whenever possible, store panels under a roof. Keep sanded panels and appearance-grade products away from high-traffic areas to prevent damage to surfaces. Use pieces of lumber to weigh down the top panel in a stack to reduce warpage from humidity. If moisture absorption is expected, cut steel bands on bundles to prevent edge damage.

If panels must be stored outside, stack them on a level platform supported by at least three 4x4s to keep them off the ground. Place one 4×4 in the center and the other two 4x4s 12 to 16 inches from the ends. Never leave panels or the platform in direct contact with the ground.

Cover the stack loosely with plastic sheets or tarps. Anchor the covering at the top of the stack, but keep it open and away from the sides and bottom to ensure good ventilation. Tight coverings prevent air circulation and when exposed to sunlight, may promote mold or mildew. (Source: APA Builder Tip U450: Storage and Handling of APA Trademarked Panels)

How many veneers/plies make up your plywood products?

The number of veneers/plies in our plywood products depends on thickness of the product. Here are the standard number of veneers/plies for some of our common thicknesses:

¼ – 3-ply

3/8 – 3-ply

11/32 – 3-ply

15/32 – 3-ply OR 4-ply

19/32 – 4-ply OR 5-ply

23/32 – 5-ply

7/8 – 6-ply

When used in the manufacture of crates and pallets, are Georgia-Pacific plywood and OSB safe for international shipping?

To prevent the introduction and spread of plant pests, ISPM 15: International Standards for Phytosanitary Measures, requires that internationally shipped solid wood pallets be debarked, treated with heat or fumigated with methyl bromide, and marked with a seal of compliance. Pallets made with engineered wood are exempt from ISPM 15 regulations. This is because the process of manufacturing engineered wood destroys any live organisms in the wood. (Source: “Boxes, Crate and Reel Manufacturing,” www.PerformancePanels.com)

Do your panels meet formaldehyde emissions standards?

Yes, Georgia-Pacific plywood and OSB panels only use moisture resistant adhesives that contain no added urea formaldehyde resins, and are therefore exempt from U.S. EPA and California formaldehyde regulations due to their very low emission rates.

Does GP's wood come from sustainably managed forests?

Plywood panels from Georgia-Pacific are made from wood sourced through a system that is third-party certified to the Sustainable Forestry Initiative® procurement standard.

How many sheets are in a unit of plywood?

The number of panels in a unit of plywood varies depending on the type and thickness of product. On sheathing products, the piece count is typically stenciled on the side of the unit. Other products have corrugated side protectors that should indicate piece count. If you need a piece count and neither of those are visible please contact GP at 800-284-5347.

What does the "span rating" of a plywood panel mean?

Within the grade stamp on a panel you will find the span rating. When there are two numbers separated by a slash (i.e. 48/24), the first number is the maximum recommended center-to-center spacing for supports in inches when the panel is used for roof sheathing with the long dimension across supports. The second number is the maximum center-to-center spacing of supports in inches when the panel is used for sub-flooring with the long dimension across supports.

What does the stamp on my plywood panel mean?

On every Georgia-Pacific sheathing panel you should be able to find an APA grade stamp. This stamp is your assurance that the product is manufactured in accordance with the APA’s rigorous program of quality inspection and testing. The grade stamp on a panel also tells you a lot about the panel – the span rating, exposure rating, panel thickness and the building code approval the panel meets.

Can plywood be used for outdoor projects?

Plywood panels classified as “Exterior” are suitable for applications subject to long-term exposure to weather or moisture.

Can you paint plywood?

Yes, plywood can be painted using one coat of acrylic latex primer and at least two coats of acrylic latex paint. Oil-based paints are not recommended.

What is the difference between Exterior and Exposure 1 panels?

Exterior panels are suitable for applications subject to long-term exposure to weather or moisture, while panels classified as Exposure 1 are intended to resist the effects of moisture on structural performance as may occur due to construction delays, or other conditions of similar severity. Exposure 1 panels are made with the same exterior adhesives used in Exterior panels. However, because other compositional factors may affect bond performance, only Exterior panels should be used for long-term exposure to weather.

What is the flame spread classification for plywood?

Class III or C

Is there a difference between span ratings for OSB and plywood?

No, span ratings for similar thicknesses are the same.